Photo of Dr Kathryn Moore

Dr Kathryn Moore

BGS Lecturer in Critical and Green Technology Metals

Email:

Location: DuMaurier 3.085

Telephone: 01326 255693

Office telephone: +44 (0)1326 255693

Kate took up the post of BGS Lecturer in Critical and Green Technology Metals in March 2012, as part of the Critical Metals Alliance between the British Geological Survey and the Camborne School of Mines. The purpose of the post is to drive research into the emerging issue of security of resource supply, particularly for the raw materials used in the low-carbon energy technologies.  Specifically, her research involves elucidating the geological concentration of the technology metals that may be subject to critically short supply. 

Her previous experimental work examines the range of magma compositions that can be generated by melting of a carbonated mantle, which provides a means to assist petrological understanding of the highly economic clan of carbonatite-related rocks that are sampled at the Earth surface. Her work on magma mingling and mixing of carbonated magmas challenges the perception that carbonatites are inherently immiscible with silicate magmas, and provides a new perspective with which to approach carbonatite petrogenesis. Recent PhD supervision includes projects on the role of carbonate in diatremic magmatism, magma-sediment-water interaction and associated mineralization, fluid-carbonatite interaction and geochemical and numerical modeling of carbonate-silicate magma mingling.

An additional academic interest in prehistoric resources, landscapes and environmental change has arisen from research into the exploitation of metals that were critical to Neolithic and Bronze Age cultures. Research areas include geoarchaeological landscape assessment techniques and geological interpretation of geomythology and place name information.  Kate has also previously been engaged in historical research associated with management of a conservation project for a historic birchbark canoe (2002-2012, James Mitchell Geology Museum, NUIG).

Qualifications and Affiliations

Diploma in Archaeology, National University of Ireland Galway 2006
PhD ‘Melting of a Carbonated Mantle’, University of Bristol 1999
B.Sc. (Hons.) Geology, University of Edinburgh 1994

Member of The Mineralogical Society
Member of the Irish Association of Economic Geology
Member of the Irish Geological Association

Professional History

Lecturer in Geology, National University of Ireland Galway 1999-2012
Part-time lecturer in Geology, University of Bristol 1997-1998
Air Quality Monitoring Officer, DFID (Montserrat Volcano Observatory) 1998

External appointments: 2003-2005, Adjunct Associate Professor, Boston University.

PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS:

Moore, K.R., 2012. Experimental study in the Na2O-CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-CO2 system at 3 GPa: the effect of sodium on mantle melting to carbonate-rich liquids and implications for the petrogenesis of silicocarbonatites.  Mineralogical Magazine 76, 285-309.
Brady, A.E., Moore, K.R., 2012. A mantle-derived dolomite silicocarbonatite from the southwest of Ireland.  Mineralogical Magazine 76, 357-376
Valentini, L., Moore, K.R., Chazot, G., 2010. Unravelling carbonatite–silicate magma interaction dynamics: A case study from the Velay province (Massif Central, France). Lithos 116, 53-64
Gwalani, L.G., Moore, K., Simonetti, A., 2010.  Carbonatites, alkaline rocks and the mantle: a special issue dedicated to Keith Bell.  Editorial.  Mineralogy and Petrology 98, 5-10
Doroshkevitch, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Moore, K.R., 2010.  Genesis of the Khaluta alkaline-basic Ba-Sr carbonatite complex (West Transbaikalia, Russia).  Mineralogy and Petrology 98 245-268.
Moore K. R., Wall. F., Divaev, F.K., Savatenkov,V.M., 2009.  Mingling of carbonatite and silicate magmas under turbulent flow conditions: Evidence from rock textures and mineral chemistry in sub-volcanic carbonatite dykes in Chagatai, Uzbekistan.  Lithos 110, 65-82.
Valentini, L., Moore, K.R., 2009.  Numerical modeling of the development of small-scale magmatic emulsions by Korteweg stress driven flow. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 179, 87-95.
Moore, K.R., 2006.  Prehistoric gold markers and environmental change: a two-age system for standing stones in western Ireland.  Geoarchaeology 21(2). 155-170. 
Costanzo, A., Moore, K.R., Wall, F., Feely, M., 2006.  Fluid inclusions in apatite from Jacupiranga calcite carbonatites: evidence for a fluid-stratified carbonatite magma chamber.  Lithos 91, 208-228.
Costanzo, A., Feely, M., Moore, K.R., 2005.  The application of Laser Raman Spectroscopy to Fluid Inclusion Studies: A case study from Pocos de Caldas Alkaline Massif, Sao Paulo State, Brazil.  Proceedings of International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE), Vol. 5826, p 110-118, Europe International Symposium OPTO Ireland.
Moore, K.R., 2004.  Historical use of stone and metal in western Ireland.  Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society 56, 1-21.
Moore, K.R, Duffell, H., Nicholl, A., Searl, A., 2002. Monitoring of airborne particulate matter during the eruption of Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat. In: Druitt, T.H. & Kokelaar, B.P. (eds) The eruption of Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, from 1995 to 1999. Geological Society, London, Memoirs, 21, 557-566.
Moore, K.R. & Wood, B.J., 1998.  The transition from primary carbonate to silicate melts in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-CO2 system.  Journal of Petrology 39; 1943-1951.

ARTICLES:

Moore, K.R., Augustine, S., Bunch, R., Lauson, P., 2008.  Oldest birchbark Canadian canoe in the world being restored: conservation of a 19th century Wolastoqiyik birchbark canoe from the collections of the James Mitchell Geology Museum, NUI Galway.  Galway’s Heritage/Oidhreacht na Gaillimhe, 16-17, 4-8.
Breheny, C., Moore, K., 2008.  Ocean floor lavas in County Waterford.  Earth Science Ireland (3), 8-11.
Moore, K.R., 2000. Respirable Ash in Volcanic Eruptions. The Irish Scientist Yearbook 7; 137.
Moore, K.R., 1999. Geoscience Probes Mantle Secrets. The Irish Scientist Yearbook 6; 135.