Mining and Minerals Engineering

CSM3371 - Solar Power (2012)

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MODULE TITLESolar Power CREDIT VALUE10
MODULE CODECSM3371 MODULE CONVENERDr Justin Hinshelwood (Coordinator)
DURATION: TERM 1 2 3
DURATION: WEEKS 3
Number of Students Taking Module (anticipated) 30
DESCRIPTION - summary of the module content

What prior knowledge skills or experience including pre-requisite and co-requisite modules does a student need to have in order to be able to take this module?

Completed first 2 years (or equivalent) on the undergraduate BSc renewable energy degree programme

Is this module suitable/ unsuitable for specialist/ non-specialist students?

Suitable for all students on the programme

Is this module recommended for interdisciplinary pathways?

Not recommended for interdisciplinary pathways.

AIMS - intentions of the module

An advanced course covering all aspects of solar thermal energy production and solar photovoltaic power generation including: resource estimation, equipment design and selection, deployment, economics and environmental impact.

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILOs) (see assessment section below for how ILOs will be assessed)

Module Specific Skills and Knowledge:

By means of preparation of a statement of the solar resource at Tremough, candidates should demonstrate:

1.that they have acquired comprehensive knowledge and understanding of solar energy potential, its geographical variance and the implications for the use of solar technology in the UK and elsewhere.

2.that they have knowledge of, and can apply, scientific and mathematical methods to analyse new and/or abstract insolation data and, without guidance, can produce bankable statements of the solar energy resource at specific sites, for both solar thermal and solar electricity applications.

By means of undertaking an integrated programme of design-install-test for a domestic PV system and designing a solar thermal system for a large heat load, candidates should demonstrate:

3.that they have acquired, and can apply scientific and mathematical methods, and knowledge of precedent practice, in the design and project development processes for solar energy projects.

4.that they have detailed knowledge and understanding of engineering components, materials and processes such that, by working autonomously, they can select and rate solar technologies to match the demands of particular user profiles, and select balance-of-plant items that maximise the solar energy harvested under cost constraints.

5.that they have appreciation of the life cycle carbon and energy balance for solar technologies and an understanding of the contribution solar technologies can make to addressing climate change.

6.that they have gained appreciation of the variety and limits of their use of solar energy technologies within different societies (especially developing countries) and of the factors which have shaped this use.

Discipline Specific Skills and Knowledge:

By means of successfully completing the assignments, candidates should demonstate:

7.they can analyse new and/or abstract data and situations scientifically, without guidance, using the range of techniques covered in the syllabus plan.

8.with minimum guidance, they can transform abstract data and concepts towards a given purpose and can produce designs that are potentially innovative.

9.they can make valid, non-trivial, observations on the operational performance and the technical and commercial risk of renewable energy projects with confidence and minimum supervision or guidance.

10.that they can critically review observations of the condition and performance of renewable energy developments including commenting on the reliability of equipment, and validity and significance of data and methods.

11.that they can investigate contradictory information in such data or methods and identify reasons for contradictions, and identify possible measures to improve this situation.

12.that they can choose an appropriate observation or design method from the complete repertoire of observation and design methods covered within the syllabus plan and are confident in evaluating own and others performance in doing so

Personal and Key Transferable/ Employment Skills and  Knowledge:

By means of completing the resource characterisation and design assignments to the agreed deadline, candidates should demonstrate:

13.autonomy in planning and managing resources that support the syllabus plan and can reflect on the efficiency of use of these resources.

14.that they can conduct and present / report calculations, to a deadline, with awareness of professional codes of conduct and can incorporate an ethical dimension and/or exercise personal judgement into/on their work.

By successfully completing the design and installation exercise, candidates should demonstrate:

15.that they can recognise differing roles within a team and the ability to assume many of these roles (including, possibly, leadership) depending on circumstances.

SYLLABUS PLAN - summary of the structure and academic content of the module

Introduction to the potential solar resource: • Understanding of the geographical variance of solar radiation and the factors that influence it. • Assessing potential for exploitation of solar energy. • Resource measurement & characterisation (laboratory experiment) • Direct & diffuse solar radiation. (laboratory experiment) • Computation of sunpath diagrams (computer workshop) Active solar thermal systems: • Nature of applications, multiple uses of technology. • Flat plate collectors • Evacuated tube collectors • System design and integration • Installation • Commissioning procedures • Performance • Fit of supply to demand accounting for variations in availability of solar resource. Large scale solar thermal electricity • Parabolic dish / Stirling engine systems • Heliostat systems • Trough concentrators Photovoltaic (PV) systems: • Introduction to semi-conductor physics. • Historical development of PV technology. • Fabrication methods. • Operational characteristics for multiple PV technologies. • Installation: grid connected, domestic and off-grid. • Performance of various PV technologies. • Cost curve, learning curve, innovation and development. • Consideration of PV technologies to include: Amorphous silicon, Mono-crystalline silicon, Poly-crystalline silicon, Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper-Indium-Diselenide (CIS) Integration to distribution systems: • Technical and regulatory concerns. • Environmental impact. • Financial appraisal. Use of PV in developing countries.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS (given in hours of study time)
Scheduled Learning & Teaching Activities 36.00 Guided Independent Study 64.00 Placement / Study Abroad
DETAILS OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS
Category Hours of study time Description
Scheduled learning & teaching activities 36 lectures, tutorials and laboratory experiments
Guided independent study 64 Private study
     

 

ASSESSMENT
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT - for feedback and development purposes; does not count towards module grade
SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT (% of credit)
Coursework 100 Written Exams 0 Practical Exams
DETAILS OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Form of Assessment % of Credit Size of Assessment (e.g. duration/length) ILOs Assessed Feedback Method

Resource characterisation exercise

20 3 pages A4, 1000 words 1,2,7,8,11 Written
PV installation 40 1500 words 3-6,9,10,12-14, 15 Written

Solar design exercise

40 1500 words 3-6, 9,10,12-14 Written
         
         

 

DETAILS OF RE-ASSESSMENT (where required by referral or deferral)
Original Form of Assessment Form of Re-assessment ILOs Re-assessed Time Scale for Re-reassessment
Summative assessment Additional assessment As above August Ref/Def period
       
       

 

RE-ASSESSMENT NOTES

As above 1 piece of CW 100%

RESOURCES
INDICATIVE LEARNING RESOURCES - The following list is offered as an indication of the type & level of
information that you are expected to consult. Further guidance will be provided by the Module Convener

Basic reading:

Boyle, G. (ed) Renewable Energy, Chapters 2 & 3, Oxford University Press. ISBN: 0199261784                                                                          

Scheer, Herman. The Solar Economy  Renewable Energy for a Sustainable Global Future, Earthscan, London, ISBN: 1844070751, Shelve Number: 333.794 SCH                       

Luque, Antonio (ed). Handbook of Photovoltaic Science and Engineering, Chichester, Wiley, 2003, ISBN: 0471491969. Shelve Number: 621.31244 LUQ                              

Martin, C.L., Solar Energy Pocket Reference, Earthscan, 2006, ISBN: 1844073068                                                                                              

Ecofys, Planning and Installing Photovoltaic Systems: A Guide for Installers, Architects and Engineers, Earthscan, London, 2005, ISBN: 1844071316, Shelve Number: 697.78 PLA

Ecofys, Planning and Installing Solar Thermal Systems: A Guide for Installers, Architects and Engineers, Earthscan, London, 2005, ISBN: 1844071251, Shelve Number: 697.78 PLA

Messenger, R.A. and Ventre J. Photovoltaic Systems Engineering, CRC Press, Boca Raton FL, ISBN: 0849317932, Shelve Number: 621.31244 MES                                    

Porteous, C. with MacGregor, K., Solar architecture in Cool Climates, ISBN: 190291662X, Shelve Number: 728.370472                                                           

Thomas, R., Photovoltaics and Architecture, Spon Press, London, ISBN: 0415231825, Shelve Number: 720.472                                                                    

ELE – CSM3371 ELE Page

Reading list for this module:

There are currently no reading list entries found for this module.

CREDIT VALUE 10 ECTS VALUE 5
PRE-REQUISITE MODULES CSM2288
CO-REQUISITE MODULES
NQF LEVEL (FHEQ) 3 (NQF Level 6) AVAILABLE AS DISTANCE LEARNING No
ORIGIN DATE Monday 12 March 2012 LAST REVISION DATE Thursday 18 October 2012
KEY WORDS SEARCH None Defined