Mathematics

MTH3026 - Cryptography (2019)

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MODULE TITLECryptography CREDIT VALUE15
MODULE CODEMTH3026 MODULE CONVENERDr Gihan Marasingha (Coordinator)
DURATION: TERM 1 2 3
DURATION: WEEKS 0 11 weeks 0
Number of Students Taking Module (anticipated) 116
DESCRIPTION - summary of the module content

Cryptography is the science of encryption. In this module, you will learn to formulate encryption as a mathematical problem. Cryptography can be defined as the conversion of data into a scrambled code that can be deciphered and sent across a public or private network.

Cryptography uses two main styles or forms of encrypting data: symmetrical and asymmetrical, and all good encryption schemes use the concept of a key which may take on any one of a number of values. The collection of all possible values is called the keyspace and encryptions and decryptions are represented as functions.

You will focus on two encryption algorithms: so called symmetric and public key algorithms, then you will concentrate on public key algorithms where you cannot deduce one key from another key. Encryption algorithms have huge commercial value; indeed, every day, millions of financial and business transactions are carried out over the internet; and security of internet transactions relies on the highest levels of encryption.


Prerequisite module: MTH3004 Number Theory and MTH2002 Algebra, or equivalent

AIMS - intentions of the module

The aim of this module is to apply elementary number theory to problems in the real world where it is important to transmit information in a secret way. For example, cryptography is used in bank accounts, and is traditionally applied in military science. Note that there is another application of number theory and linear algebra called coding theory - but this is not the same as cryptography.

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILOs) (see assessment section below for how ILOs will be assessed)

On successful completion of this module, you should be able to:

Module Specific Skills and Knowledge:

1 formulate encryption as a mathematical problem;

2 demonstrate an understanding of public key cryptography, other practical crypto-systems, some useful impractical ones and some peculiar cryptosystems like the hidden monomial or the combinatorial-algebraic cryptosystem;

3 articulate the complexity of computations in cryptography.

Discipline Specific Skills and Knowledge:

4 reveal a grasp of the number-theoretic and algebraic aspects of cryptography.

Personal and Key Transferable/ Employment Skills and  Knowledge:

5 show an appreciation of how concrete problems typically require abstract theories for their solution;

6 display a comprehension of how to apply algorithms and why they work.

SYLLABUS PLAN - summary of the structure and academic content of the module

- introduction to cryptography, history of cryptography Symmetric and anti-symmetric cryptosystems; some simple examples;

- one way functions;

- number theoretic cryptography: introduction to congruences and prime numbers; Euler’s totient function, the integer factorisation and discrete logarithm problems;

- the RSA cryptosystem (Rivest Shamir Adleman), the ElGamal cryptosystem;

- possible attacks and their computational complexity;

- algebraic cryptography: a short review of group and field theory;

- hidden monomial cryptosystem;

- several group-theoretic cryptostems;

- a view of elliptic curve cryptography.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS (given in hours of study time)
Scheduled Learning & Teaching Activities 33.00 Guided Independent Study 117.00 Placement / Study Abroad 0.00
DETAILS OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS
Category Hours of study time Description
Scheduled learning and teaching activities 33 Lectures/example classes
Guided independent study 117 Lecture and assessment preparation; private study
     

 

ASSESSMENT
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT - for feedback and development purposes; does not count towards module grade
Form of Assessment Size of Assessment (e.g. duration/length) ILOs Assessed Feedback Method
Coursework – three example sheets   All Written
       
       
       
       

 

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT (% of credit)
Coursework 20 Written Exams 80 Practical Exams 0
DETAILS OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Form of Assessment % of Credit Size of Assessment (e.g. duration/length) ILOs Assessed Feedback Method
Coursework – based on questions submitted for assessment 20 2 assignments, 30 hours total All Annotated script and written/verbal feedback
Written Exam – closed book 80 2 hours All Written/verbal on request, SRS
         
         
         
         

 

DETAILS OF RE-ASSESSMENT (where required by referral or deferral)
Original Form of Assessment Form of Re-assessment ILOs Re-assessed Time Scale for Re-reassessment
All above Written Exam (100%) All August Ref/Def period
       
       

 

RE-ASSESSMENT NOTES

If a module is normally assessed entirely by coursework, all referred/deferred assessments will normally be by assignment.

If a module is normally assessed by examination or examination plus coursework, referred and deferred assessment will normally be by examination. For referrals, only the examination will count, a mark of 40% being awarded if the examination is passed. For deferrals, candidates will be awarded the higher of the deferred examination mark or the deferred examination mark combined with the original coursework mark.

RESOURCES
INDICATIVE LEARNING RESOURCES - The following list is offered as an indication of the type & level of
information that you are expected to consult. Further guidance will be provided by the Module Convener

ELE – http://vle.exeter.ac.uk

Reading list for this module:

Type Author Title Edition Publisher Year ISBN Search
Set Koblitz, Neal A course in Number theory and Cryptography Graduate Text in Mathematics Springer 1994 [Library]
Set Buchmann, J Introduction to Cryptography 2nd Springer 2004 978-0387207568 [Library]
CREDIT VALUE 15 ECTS VALUE 7.5
PRE-REQUISITE MODULES MTH2002, MTH3004
CO-REQUISITE MODULES
NQF LEVEL (FHEQ) 6 AVAILABLE AS DISTANCE LEARNING No
ORIGIN DATE Tuesday 10 July 2018 LAST REVISION DATE Friday 30 August 2019
KEY WORDS SEARCH Fermat's little theorem; Miller-Rabin test; cryptosystems (symmetric cryptosystems and public key cryptosystems); encryption; decryption; RSA - and related cryptosystems; discrete logarithmic problems.