Geology

CSM2904 - CSM Professionalism Year 2 (2019)

Back | Download as PDF
MODULE TITLECSM Professionalism Year 2 CREDIT VALUE0
MODULE CODECSM2904 MODULE CONVENERProf Kip Jeffrey (Coordinator)
DURATION: TERM 1 2 3
DURATION: WEEKS 0 7 0
Number of Students Taking Module (anticipated) 45
DESCRIPTION - summary of the module content

This module follows on from the Year 1 Professionalism module and is designed to build upon the Professionalism concepts and ideas that were covered in year 1, with the aim of continuing the students’ preparation for their future careers. It will draw on the experience of staff, UoE support services and external visitors.

It will provide ideas on the range of opportunities that can be undertaken that would aid professional development both during studies and in the workplace. 

 

AIMS - intentions of the module

The lectures, talks and workshop sessions will develop an understanding of the typical potential professional routes that our students and graduates can take, the realities of research field activities, international and site-based careers. It will explore the importance of professional attitudes and ethical behaviours in terms of both companies and these careers. It will also look at the role of mentoring, and engagement with Professional bodies. The concepts covered will also be part of individual tutorials and an opportunity for students to reflect, discuss and track their individual journey with their tutors.

 

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILOs) (see assessment section below for how ILOs will be assessed)

Module Specific Skills and Knowledge:

1

Examine the role of professionalism in behaviour and conduct, and how that applies to the academic and workplace environments.

2

Identify an employability strategy, to prepare for a professional career.

Discipline Specific Skills and Knowledge:

3

Compare and contrast the geoscience and mining based industries and the career options they hold.

4

 Describe the skills required for geoscience and mining industry careers.

Personal and Key Transferable/ Employment Skills and  Knowledge:

5

Apply aspects of professionalism in personal behaviours and activities, understanding their impact on professional life.

6

Identify the personal development activities that aid professional development.

7

Distinguish organisational risks, taking responsibility for your personal safety and risk priorities in the academic and working environment.

 

SYLLABUS PLAN - summary of the structure and academic content of the module

This will be delivered through approximately one and a half days of talks, lectures, workshops and personal activities. Group work will be used as well as interaction with those in Year two and outside organisations.

 

 

Ethics in geoscience & mining

Graduates will have many ethical considerations to make throughout their careers, starting with their academic life.

For the academic environment; scientific integrity, plagiarism, crediting others ideas, correct referencing, are some of the aspects that are part of the ethical consideration. In addition to this academics, researchers and those working the mining and the field of geoscience, may also carefully consider the impact of their studies and the use of their findings. Ethics are not just a moral issue, some ethical issues are also linked to laws and what the professional community would consider as acceptable or not.

 

Corporate Responsibility and Professional Integrity

As with many industries, academia, geoscience and mining all operate under socially and environmentally acceptable parameters, which can vary depending on local and national laws and regulations.  When considering mining (including exploration and geoscience research),  the Social Licence to Operate and Corporate Social responsibility, environmental responsibility, community consultation; costs v performance; How an individual’s statements or actions towards a local community or local environment reflects on the company. As many mining companies are global and answer to shareholders in countries outside of those that they operate in, they often perform to standards higher than those set by local governments.

 

Network Development

Engaging with CPD, Professional Associations,  alumni, and voluntary organisations both related to mining & geoscience activities as well as other voluntary and good citizenship initiatives – this will help you leverage opportunities and potential referees, as well as learning from more experienced industry professionals.

 

Professional Associations

CSM graduates are recruited because they are considered to be specialists, this applies to both geoscientists and mining engineers. It is important for students to start thinking about joining relevant professional bodies, develop a professional diary and document your professional activities as this will help towards Chartership status. It may take several years to achieve Chartership and it is important to appreciate the requirements and start documenting relevant activities as you progress through your career.

Mentors and Role Model

It’s useful to identify professionals (in academia and in the work place) who are willing to act as mentors. They can advise on challenges, ethical dilemmas, career development advice, training and much else.

 Unconventional working routines and living conditions

While away on field work or at a mine site, unconventional work patterns can impact our personal life and wellbeing.  Some geoscience and mining careers are extremely well paid, but the work is often challenging and requires personal sacrifices.

Geoscience research, Exploration, and  Mining; careers related to these fields often takes us to remote parts of the world, whether we are exploring for new minerals or collecting data for a PhD project, the working environment in remote areas can be harsh with very basic comforts. Most mine sites around the world are well resourced with good facilities offering comfortable conditions, but life away from home and working long shifts can be demanding mentally and physically. Learning to take care of your health and wellbeing is important.

The mining industry, old perceptions and modern day realities

Historically mining was a male dominated industry, like many other industries, and some may argue that due to the life style and working environment it still is in some parts of the world. The reality is that women are well represented and the industry has a very different face to the one portrayed by stereotypes. Mining and geosciences offer rewarding but challenging careers and this requires people with the best skills regardless of gender.  There are also important employment trends and skills requirements that have changed over time.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS (given in hours of study time)
Scheduled Learning & Teaching Activities 12.00 Guided Independent Study 6.00 Placement / Study Abroad 0.00
DETAILS OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS

Category

Hours of study time

Description

Seminar/ lectures

2

Lectures based on the above syllabus plan

Group workshop

6

Dealing with scenarios, team building exercise, debate about CSR/SLO and its necessity. Group presentation on Ethics in Mining. Applying for Chartership: how/when to do it?

Guest speaker

2

Mining industry or geoscience professional discussing their experience and career.  A small group of CSM Staff giving a quick talk on their careers (includes talk on PhD life)

 

 

Activities also in scheduled tutorials

 

ASSESSMENT
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT - for feedback and development purposes; does not count towards module grade

N/A

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT (% of credit)
Coursework 0 Written Exams 0 Practical Exams 0
DETAILS OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Form of Assessment

 

% of credit

Size of the assessment  e.g. duration/length

ILOs assessed

Feedback method

Participation in one of several mentoring activity with Year One students

Pass / fail

1hr activity

1-7

Confirm presence. Group discussion on student life in year 1 & 2 and preparation for professional career.

Professional diary and Professional associations

Pass / fail

5 hour

1-7

Start and maintain a professional diary detailing CPD and other activities that are required for Chartership. Show this to your tutor or mentor. Record on My Progress.

Complete an evaluation sheet on your academic, personal and professional skills and identify areas you need to improve and a strategy for improvement.

Pass / fail

2 hour

1-7

Complete the evaluation form with your tutor during individual tutorial and record this on My Progress.

Note: This module is assessed with simple pass/fail based on participation and completion of summative assessments.

DETAILS OF RE-ASSESSMENT (where required by referral or deferral)

Original form of assessment

Form of re-assessment

ILOs re-assessed

Time scale for re-assessment

 

Retake the three Summative assessments.

 

Completion before end of Summer exams the following year

 

RE-ASSESSMENT NOTES
RESOURCES
INDICATIVE LEARNING RESOURCES - The following list is offered as an indication of the type & level of
information that you are expected to consult. Further guidance will be provided by the Module Convener

Reading list for this module:

There are currently no reading list entries found for this module.

CREDIT VALUE 0 ECTS VALUE 0
PRE-REQUISITE MODULES None
CO-REQUISITE MODULES None
NQF LEVEL (FHEQ) 7 AVAILABLE AS DISTANCE LEARNING No
ORIGIN DATE Monday 09 September 2019 LAST REVISION DATE Wednesday 02 October 2019
KEY WORDS SEARCH Professionalism, Employability, Responsibility, CPD, Skills, Personal development