Engineering

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ECM3152 - Computational Engineering (2015)

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MODULE TITLEComputational Engineering CREDIT VALUE15
MODULE CODEECM3152 MODULE CONVENERProf Gavin Tabor (Coordinator)
DURATION: TERM 1 2 3
DURATION: WEEKS 11 weeks 0 0
Number of Students Taking Module (anticipated) 76
DESCRIPTION - summary of the module content

Computers can use numerical methods and algorithyms to analyse and solve problems, including fluid flows - fluids in motion. They can also perform stress analyses - to determine the stresses and strains in materials and structures subject to forces or loads. Computational engineering covers everything from aircraft, cars and racing cars to blood flow.

 

Practical work and theory go hand in hand on this 100% coursework module, providing you with a solid introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Stress Analysis (CSA); exploring the theory of CFD and Finite Element (FE) analysis, the mathematical modelling of fluids and stresses in solids, and computational issues.

 

This module introduces you to numerical design approaches currently used in industry to analyse systems. You will examine their common pitfalls, as well as gaining experience of using commercial CFD and Finite Element (FE) codes. Practically, you will use industry standard codes to tackle miniprojects on fluid flow and stress analysis, which encourages you to work independently with industry standard codes. 

By the end of this module, you should have a strong grasp of CFD and FEA and be able to use the codes fluently to model various articles and systems, as well as having gained an introduction to Finite Difference techniques. You should also be competent in applying a numerical analysis for a specified engineering design problem and be able to check the accuracy of numerical results. Year 3 students often build on their computational engineering skills by applying them to their third year project, during the last term.

 

Prerequisite module: ECM1102, ECM2109, ECM2113, ECM2114 or equivalent


Corequisite module: ECM3151 or equivalent

 

AIMS - intentions of the module

The purpose of this module is to introduce you to the main numerical design approaches currently used by industry to analyse mechanical systems. You will examine common pitfalls associated with these approaches, and will gain experience in using common commercial CFD and FE codes. Furthermore, you will use numerical packages, giving you the ability to perform a more in-depth individual project in the sixth term.

In addition, this module covers the topics of journal bearings and fracture, using a problem-based learning approach in the case studies, and examining them through the report and viva. You will hone your independent learning skills through investigating these topics through a combination of background reading, private study and computational analysis.

 

This module covers Specific Learning Outcomes in Engineering, which apply to accredited programmes at Bachelors/MEng/Masters level. These contribute to the  educational requirements for CEng registration (as defined under the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence – UK-SPEC).


This module correlates to references U1, E1 - E3, S3, P1, P4, MU1 - MU3 and ME1 - ME3. These references are indices of the specific learning outcomes expected of Bachelors/MEng/Masters candidates set out in UK-SPEC, codified with reference to systems used by professional accrediting institutions. A full list of the standards can be found on the Engineering Council's website, at http://www.engc.org.uk

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILOs) (see assessment section below for how ILOs will be assessed)
On successful completion of this module, you should be able to:
 

Module Specific Skills and Knowledge:
1 rapidly choose and implement an appropriate numerical analysis for a specified engineering design problem;
2 explain the basic concepts of Finite Difference, Finite Volume and Finite Element analysis;
3 describe how to check the accuracy and relevance of numerical results;
4 state where and when more advanced concepts must be implemented, e.g turbulence, non-linear geometry and/or material;
5 apply theoretical analysis of long journal bearings and contrast with practical cases;
6 comprehend the theoretical processes involved in fracture and contrast with realistic fracture failure.
Discipline Specific Skills and Knowledge:
7 understand the core mechanical engineering theoretical concepts covered in the module;
8 incorporate computational analysis into the design process.
Personal and Key Transferable/ Employment Skills and  Knowledge:
9 write concise technical reports;
10 monitor your own progress;
11 set realistic targets;
12 modify your targets and learning strategies appropriately;
13 provide constructive feedback to teaching staff.

 

SYLLABUS PLAN - summary of the structure and academic content of the module

- eleven teaching weeks, (see detailed learning outcomes/assessment criteria for detail);

- introduction to computational methods and applications;

- finite difference schemes: differencing, implicit vs explicit schemes, stability, convergence;

- introduction to finite element techniques using 1-d : cantilever beam;

- familiarisation with industry standard FE code;

- shape functions;

- stiffness Matrix;

- Von-Mises stress;

- non-linear behaviour;

- introduction to CFD;

- basics of Finite Volume methodology;

- PISO and SIMPLE algorithms;

- boundary conditions;

- turbulence modelling;

- familiarity with Standard CFD code: simple flow cases, (flow around cylinder, lid driven cavity);

- case studies: Long Journal Bearing Theory, Fracture Mechanics.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS (given in hours of study time)
Scheduled Learning & Teaching Activities 31.00 Guided Independent Study 119.00 Placement / Study Abroad 29.00
DETAILS OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS
Category Hours of study time Description
Scheduled learning and teaching activities 11 Lectures
Scheduled learning and teaching activities 20 Supervised computer time
Guided independent study 119 Lecture and assessment preparation; wider reading

 

ASSESSMENT
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT - for feedback and development purposes; does not count towards module grade
Form of Assessment Size of Assessment (e.g. duration/length) ILOs Assessed Feedback Method
Not applicable      
       
       
       
       

 

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT (% of credit)
Coursework 100 Written Exams 0 Practical Exams
DETAILS OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Form of Assessment % of Credit Size of Assessment (e.g. duration/length) ILOs Assessed Feedback Method
Coursework – problem sheets 30 5 hours 1, 6, 9 Written, e-mail and class discussion
Coursework – 1st case study 35 50 hours 2-6, 7-13 Written, e-mail and class discussion
Coursework – 2nd case study 35 50 hours 2-6, 7-13 Written, e-mail and class discussion
         
         

 

DETAILS OF RE-ASSESSMENT (where required by referral or deferral)
Original Form of Assessment Form of Re-assessment ILOs Re-assessed Time Scale for Re-reassessment
All above Coursework (100%) All Completed over summer with a deadline in August
       
       

 

RE-ASSESSMENT NOTES

If a module is normally assessed entirely by coursework, all referred/deferred assessments will normally be by assignment.

If a module is normally assessed by examination or examination plus coursework, referred and deferred assessment will normally be by examination. For referrals, only the examination will count, a mark of 40% being awarded if the examination is passed. For deferrals, candidates will be awarded the higher of the deferred examination mark or the deferred examination mark combined with the original coursework mark.

RESOURCES
INDICATIVE LEARNING RESOURCES - The following list is offered as an indication of the type & level of
information that you are expected to consult. Further guidance will be provided by the Module Convener

ELE – http://vle.exeter.ac.uk

Reading list for this module:

Type Author Title Edition Publisher Year ISBN Search
Set Chapra, S.C. and Canale. R.P Numerical Methods for Engineers 6th McGraw-Hill 2010 9780071267595 [Library]
Set Versteeg H K and Malalasekera V An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics: The finite volume method 2nd Pearson/Prentice Hall 2007 978-0131274983 [Library]
Set Henwood, D.J. and Bonet, J. Finite Elements. A Gentle Introduction Macmillan 1996 978-0333646267 [Library]
CREDIT VALUE 15 ECTS VALUE 7.5
PRE-REQUISITE MODULES ECM1102, ECM2113, ECM2114, ECM2109
CO-REQUISITE MODULES ECM3151
NQF LEVEL (FHEQ) 3 (NQF Level 6) AVAILABLE AS DISTANCE LEARNING No
ORIGIN DATE Friday 09 January 2015 LAST REVISION DATE Friday 09 January 2015
KEY WORDS SEARCH Computational simulation; finite difference; finite volume; finite element; turbulence simulation; elasticity.