Engineering

ECM2113 - Thermofluid Engineering (2010)

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MODULE TITLEThermofluid Engineering CREDIT VALUE15
MODULE CODEECM2113 MODULE CONVENERProf Fayyaz Ali Memon (Coordinator), Prof Gavin Tabor
DURATION: TERM 1 2 3
DURATION: WEEKS
Number of Students Taking Module (anticipated)
DESCRIPTION - summary of the module content
AIMS - intentions of the module
To introduce students to the theory, principles and practice of engineering fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer, and to prepare for advanced courses in these areas.
INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES (ILOs) (see assessment section below for how ILOs will be assessed)
Note: List A comprises core outcomes that will be covered fully in lectures and must be achieved by all students to meet the minimum university requirement for progression. List B comprises outcomes that are EITHER more difficult to achieve OR are to be achieved by private study (or both). All outcomes will be assessed, and coverage of List B outcomes is essential for both BEng and MEng students. [b]A: THRESHOLD LEVEL[/b] (1) Fluid Dynamics: Students should be able to: Describe basic methods of measuring pressure, velocity and speed in a fluid flow. Distinguish between laminar and turbulent flow, classify flow types using Reynolds number. Apply control volume concept to a fluid flow. Use conservation of mass, momentum within control volume to derive solutions to simple problems (e.g. Jet impact). Identify terms in Bernoulli's equation, head equation, apply to internal flows including the effects of head losses in pipes and fittings: use Darcy-Weisbach equation and Moody diagram to determine head losses; solve head loss problems. Describe fundamentals of open channel flow; distinguish between sub- and super-critical using Froude number, explain basics of flow in weirs and flumes. Distinguish between concepts of streaklines, streamlines, pathlines: describe basic concepts of potential flow and potential/stream functions; identify when potential/stream functions applicable; compute vorticity for a given flow explain and justify concept of a boundary layer. (2) Energy conversion and heat tranfer. Students should be able to: Quote the first law of thermodynamics; explain the concepts of heat and work, Internal energy, enthalpy & heat capacity; identify and differeniate between closed and open systems, steady flow; apply these concepts to perform simple work and power calculations. Quote the second law of thermodynamics, define entropy; contrast perfect gases, real substances; use thermodynamic data from charts and steam tables, perform calculations for heat transfer, throttling, compression and expansion. Discuss compressors and turbines, identify types, calculate flow rates, perform work and power calculations. Analyse steam power plant, contrast variants; discuss basics of electricity generation. Contrast basic heat transfer mechanisms; conduction, convection, radiation; select and evaluate appropriate dimensionless groups to describe heat transfer in different cases; evaluate heat transfer coefficients; classify heat exchangers (shell and tube, cross flow, etc). [b]B: GOOD TO EXCELLENT[/b] (1) Derive dimensionless groups from specified variables. Use integral techniques to evaluate flow rates in non-uniform flows. Identify minor losses and apply standard formulae to include their effect in pipe flow problems; solve flow rate and sizing problems; identify head, flow and power coefficients for pumps and match flow and power to pipes. Evaluate hydraulic radius and calculate flow rates through open channels composed of a variety of materials using Chezy and Manning formulae; calculate flow rates over weirs (broad-crested, thin plate) using standard weir equations. Evaluate velocity components from given potential/stream functionin cartesian and polar coordinates; derive potential/stream functions from each other and from velocity components; apply Bernoulli's theorem along a streamline to determine pressure, solve external flow problems; summarise and resolve d'Alembert's paradox. (2) Discuss Gibbs and Helmholtz functions; apply and manipulate thermodynamic functions and relationships to solve thermodynamic system problems; summarise thermodynamic aspects of perfect gases, contrast with real substances; perform more complicated work and power calculations. Calculate cycle, work, heat, power, and efficiency for Carnot and Rankine cycles; evaluate efficiencies, coefficients of performance Perform heat exchanger design calculations; solve heating and cooling problems, coupled conduction/convection, natural convection and heat transfer with phase change problems; discuss basics of radiative heat transfer.
SYLLABUS PLAN - summary of the structure and academic content of the module
Revision of basics; viscosity, measurement of velocity and pressure, laminar, transitional and turbulent flow, Reynolds experiment. Conservation equations and their application to simple problems in external and internal flow. Dimensionless groups; derivation and use, in particular Reynolds and Froude numbers. Bernoulli's equation for external flow, head equation for internal flow, concept of head loss, Darcy-Weisbach equation, Moody diagram and minor losses. Free surface flows; open channel flow, basics of weirs and flumes. Streamlines, streaklines and pathlines, potential flow, solution using potential and stream functions, concept of boundary layers for external flows. Introduction to and laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic functions, behaviour of perfect gases, phase behaviour of real substances, thermodynamic charts and tables, application to heat exchangers, throttling processes, compressors, Carnot, Rankine cycles. Heat transfer, basic mechanisms – especially conduction, convection, heat exchangers, heat transfer coefficients, heating and cooling problems, coupled conduction/convection problems, natural convection, heat transfer with phase change, introduction to radiative heat transfer.
LEARNING AND TEACHING
LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS (given in hours of study time)
Scheduled Learning & Teaching Activities Guided Independent Study Placement / Study Abroad
DETAILS OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND TEACHING METHODS
ASSESSMENT
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT - for feedback and development purposes; does not count towards module grade
SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT (% of credit)
Coursework 40 Written Exams 60 Practical Exams
DETAILS OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
DETAILS OF RE-ASSESSMENT (where required by referral or deferral)
RE-ASSESSMENT NOTES
RESOURCES
INDICATIVE LEARNING RESOURCES - The following list is offered as an indication of the type & level of
information that you are expected to consult. Further guidance will be provided by the Module Convener

Reading list for this module:

Type Author Title Edition Publisher Year ISBN Search
Set Rogers, G.F.G. and Mayhew, Y.R. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Fluids SI UNITS 5th Blackwell 2009 978-0631197034 [Library]
Set Douglas, J.F., Gasiorek, J.M., Swaffield, J.A. Fluid Mechanics 6th Pearson/Prentice Hall 2011 10: 0273717723 [Library]
Set Rogers, G.F.G. and Mayhew, Y.R. Engineering Thermodynamics Work and Heat Transfer Longman 1996 0-582-04566-5 [Library]
Set Eastop, T.D. and McConkey, A. Applied Thermodynamics for Engineering Technologists 5th Longman 1993 0-582-09193-4 [Library]
CREDIT VALUE 15 ECTS VALUE 7.5
PRE-REQUISITE MODULES ECM1102
CO-REQUISITE MODULES
NQF LEVEL (FHEQ) 2 AVAILABLE AS DISTANCE LEARNING No
ORIGIN DATE Thursday 15 December 2011 LAST REVISION DATE Thursday 15 December 2011
KEY WORDS SEARCH None Defined